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 »  Home  »  Science  »  Professor Tefko Saracevic distinguished Croatian-American expert in Information Sciences
 »  Home  »  People  »  Professor Tefko Saracevic distinguished Croatian-American expert in Information Sciences
 »  Home  »  Education  »  Professor Tefko Saracevic distinguished Croatian-American expert in Information Sciences
Professor Tefko Saracevic distinguished Croatian-American expert in Information Sciences
By Darko Žubrinić | Published  09/27/2014 | Science , People , Education | Unrated
Recipient of honorary doctorate from the University of Zadar, Croatia, founded in 1396


Dr. Tefko Saračević, Professor at the Rutgers University, USA; photo from 1991


Summary. Professor Tefko Saračević studied electrical engineering at the University of Zagreb, Croatia and completed Ph.D. (1970) studies in information science at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. As principal investigator or co-principal he has received research grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes for Health, Department of Education, Council for Library Resources, the Rockefeller Foundation, UNESCO, and several other national and international organizations. His results are widely reported, distributed, and cited. He is recipient of honorary doctorate from the University of Zadar (the oldest Croatian university, founded in 1396).



Interview with Professor Tefko Saračević, US Embassy in Madrid, Spain


 
Professor Tefko Saračević, biographical sketch

Education & positions: Studied electrical engineering at the University of Zagreb, Croatia and completed his master (1962) and Ph.D. (1970) studies in information science at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Taught and conducted research at Case till 1985, when moved to Rutgers. Promoted to Professor II (highest academic rank at Rutgers Univ.) in 1991. Associate Dean from 2003 to 2006. Professor Emeritus since 2010.

Research: Over the years he conducted research and published widely on: test and evaluation of information retrieval systems; notion of relevance in information science; human aspects in human-computer interaction in information retrieval; user and use studies in information science and librarianship; studies of user-derived value of information and library services; evaluation of digital libraries; and analysis of Web queries as submitted to search engines. As principal investigator or co-principal he has received research grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes for Health, Department of Education, Council for Library Resources, the Rockefeller Foundation, UNESCO, and several other national and international organizations. Results are widely reported, distributed, and cited.

International: Active internationally, particularly in relation to information problems in developing countries. For over a decade he was involved with the Rockefeller Foundation in design, deployment, and evaluation of compact high-quality, low-cost medical information systems in developing countries. He was a visiting professor at four universities abroad. He also worked and consulted with a number of international organizations on development and evaluation of information systems and libraries. He has given seminars, lectures and courses, or consulted, and presented papers at international meetings in 43 countries, and was an invited keynote speaker at over a dozen international conferences. Co-chair of the biennial conference and course Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) held in Zadar, Croatia.

Professional recognition: He is active in a number of professional associations. He was the president of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) in 1991. He received the Gerard Salton Award for Excellence in Research, by the Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval, Association for Computing Machinery (SIGIR/ACM) in 1997; the ASIS Award of Merit (highest award given by the Society) in 1995; the 1989 Best Paper Award in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science; the ASIS Outstanding Information Science Teacher Award in 1985; and the Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research in 1991. In 1994 he was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Zagreb, Croatia; he was granted a second Fulbright scholarship for 1999. As of September 2014 he has received 3,243 citations in Scopus database (covers journal citations since 1996 and excludes self citations). In Google Scholar (with a broader coverage of all kinds of documents in addition to journals) he recived 10,375 citations. In a histogram of citations from papers in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST & predecessor names), done by Eugene Garfield from the Web of Science for years 1956-2004 and involving 3725 authors, he ranked first in citations to his work both in articles in the Journal (Total Local Citation Score) and in articles globally from that Journal (Total Global Citation Score).

Editorial boards: He was and is a member of a number of editorial boards. He was Editor-in Chief from 1985 to 2008 of Information Processing & Management, an international journal published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Regular reviewer for a number of journals and granting agencies.

Source comminfo.rutgers.edu/~tefko/biosketch.htm



Tefko Saracevic, a well-known scholar and teacher of library and information science, donated $100,000 to support top doctoral students at the Ph.D. Program in Communication, Information and Library Studies at Rutgers, with first award given to a student in fall 2012. In this video Professor Tefko Saracevic is interviewed by Marija Dalbello, Director of the Ph.D. program in Communication, Information and Library Studies, about his gift to support best students and his views on doctoral education.



Tefko Saračević, a well-known scholar and teacher of library and information science, donated $100,000 to support top doctoral students at the Ph.D. Program in Communication, Information and Library Studies at Rutgers, with first award given to a student in fall 2012. In this video Professor Tefko Saracevic is interviewed by Marija Dalbello, Director of the Ph.D. program in Communication, Information and Library Studies, about his gift to support best students and his views on doctoral education.



Tefko Saracevic discusses problems he sees for the field
It's a real pity for the world of LIS that you can not find a single video on You Tube by this great professor and legend of Information Science. I had an honor to meet his great personality (and enjoy his great sense of humor) at Rutgers in 2004 where he was my mentor for an 2004/2005 JFDP program and at LIDA conference in Dubrovnik in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009.

The interview is done by Beth Logan (then at School of Information Studies, Florida State University) at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the American society for Information Science - now American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) as a part of a project dealing with oral history of information science.



Tefko Saracevic - Anecdotes about major players and the early days of information science


It's a real pity for the world of LIS that you can not find a single video on You Tube by this great professor and legend of Information Science. I had an honor to meet his great personality (and enjoy his great sense of humor) at Rutgers in 2004 where he was my mentor for an 2004/2005 JFDP program and at LIDA conference in Dubrovnik in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009.

The interview is done by Beth Logan (then at School of Information Studies, Florida State University) at the 2000 Annual Meeting of the American society for Information Science - now American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) as a part of a project dealing with oral history of information science.


Tefko Saračević - Obtener información de calidad


 
Dubrovnik, Croatia tourist information
A beautiful walled, mediaeval city. The pearl of the Adriatic. A most unusual place. Love to visit it. Nearby are many lovely islands. And other small towns on the sea. Going to Dubrovnik is like going to another world from the past.
Favorite hotels in Dubrovnik: Excelsior and Argentina.
Favorite hangoutin Dubrovnik: Trubadur
Favorite nearby island: Mljet, with a national park.
Favorite hotel on Mljet (and the only one): Odisej

Zagreb, Croatia general country information
The city and country of my birth. Love to visit there, many good friends are still around. And family.

Twice was a Fulbright scholar there at the University of Zagreb and the National and University Library.

The life in Zagreb is lively and diverse.
Nearby is Medvednica, a mountain where I like to go hiking. In my youth, I was an active and enthusiastic member of the University Mountaineering Society "Velebit." They are still at it. It was named after Velebit, a rugged and beautiful mountain that became a national park.
Talking about national parks: Plitvice National Park is a unique district of lakes and cascades; great for hiking.

Gorski Kotar is another one of my favorite area for hiking and mountaneering - parts are still wild and unspoiled, especially around mountain Bjelolasica. Look for Bijele Stijene (White Rocks) and Samarske Stijene (Samarske Rocks) - stunning!

Source comminfo.rutgers.edu/~tefko/favorites.htm




 
The Tefko 2010 Symposium: Honoring Tefko Saracevic on His 80th Birthday

Friends, colleagues, and students of Professor Tefko Saracevic gathered at the TEFKO 2010 Conference, held at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ on November 7-8 to celebrate his 80th birthday.  Saracevic has been a giant in the information industry and a pioneer in information retrieval at Rutgers for many years, during which he has become a friend and mentor to many.  Sponsored by the School of Communication & Information, the celebration was divided into three parts: The Pregnant Past, The Amazing Present, and The Foreseeable Future (unfortunately, I was not able to attend the opening session on the past, so this report will only cover the other two sessions).

Tefko’s list of achievements, honors, teaching and professional activities, is too long and varied to recite here, but it is available on his web page.  He taught courses on online information retrieval at Case Western Reserve Univeristy and Rutgers for many years, and although he retired in June 2010, he continues to teach an online course on digital libraries.  He has also been a prime mover and organizer of the annual Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) conference in Zadar, Croatia (his native country), and he  edited a prominent information science journal, Information Processing & Management (IP&M) from 1985 to 2007.  He was also on the Editorial Board of Information Science & Technology Abstracts, where I had the pleasure of working with him for several years.


Professor Tefko Saračević

Gary Marchionini, Dean of the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, opened the second day of TEFKO 2010 with a portrait of Tefko as a scientist and scholar, teacher and mentor, leader, and friend.

Tefko as a scientist and philosopher
He has studied a number of the human elements in information retrieval, such as aboutness, relevance, and the science of context.  Context is multi-layered, and interaction among information users is asymmetric.  Context is necessary, and interaction has context; the problem is that we do not know how to measure it. This is a new kind of interaction that we have not been able to study scientifically in the past.  We do it at points, like the interaction among humans on a social platform such as Facebook, but we need to be able to do it over time.

Tefko as a leader
Besides his work as Editor of IP&M, when he made it a pre-eminent journal in the field, his efforts on the LIDA conference were instrumental in making it a special experience for attendees and also in strengthening US-Croatian international relationships.  He also led the American Society for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T) as its President in 1991, and received its Award of Merit in 1995.

Tefko as a friend
Marchionini surveyed some of Tefko’s acquaintances and asked them to tell him the first thing that came into their minds when they thought of him. 

Another of Tefko’s students, Jim Jansen, now at Pennsylvania State University and the Pew Internet and American Life Project, discussed online shopping and fruitful areas for future information science research.  58% of Americans perform online research on products and services that they are considering purchasing, and 74% of them have made purchases or travel reservations online.  Sponsored search is a big business for the search engines; it is Google’s primary revenue source, producing over $24 billion in 2009.  Advertisers are interested in targeting of consumers; over 75% of advertisers say they would pay a premium for this service.

Jansen said that advertising is information, so it is a fruitful research area.  He conducted a survey of online shopping behavior of males and females, which disproved several market assumptions by showing that:

    Targeting by gender is expensive and may not yield significant sales increases.
    Key phrases that were gender neutral performed the best, resulting in twice as many impressions and 2˝ times as many clicks.
    Gender may not be a dominant factor in predicting consumer behavior; it may be product-related.  For example a purchaser may be buying a gift for someone of the opposite gender.

Jansen’s survey showed that information science can bring much to the domain of sponsored search, and there are many questions that need to be answered.


Michael Lesk, formerly a computer scientist at Bell Labs and other research organizations and now one of Tefko’s colleagues at Rutgers, looked at the future of books in his closing endnote address.  He began by noting that digitization of out of copyright books has mostly been done; some books have been digitized multiple times.  E-books have entered the mainstream, and to verify that, all you need to do is look around on any commuter train.  For books in print, the Kindle store now offers 720,000 books for download, and soon books that do not appear on it will go out of print.  Out of print but still in copyright books have also largely been digitized by Google, but access to them is being blocked by lawyers.  Advantages of e-books include:

    They have increased the variety of books we can read.
    They are searchable.
    Any number of them can be carried with you.
    They can be obtained instantly; there is no need to go to a store to buy them.

Lesk also observed that Starbucks has recently launched the free Starbucks Digital Network in partnership with Yahoo! to bring information to customers in its stores.  And libraries are opening coffee bars, so he wondered if there is an opportunity for collaboration.  This and other trends show that information is the new oil that is fueling today’s economy.  And based on the perceived benefits of advertising, Google is worth $53 billion per year, according to Google’s Chief Economist, Hal Varian.  So of these trends continue, what will be left for libraries to do?  Lesk suggests that they move into data curation and help scientists comply with NSF requirements that they store their data in long-term repositories.

A closing panel of Tefko and the plenary speakers continued this discussion.  Gary Marchionini noted that libraries are becoming community centers–places for interactions, and Tefko said that Mark Twain’s famous remark about the reports of his death being exaggerated applies to libraries as well.  Libraries are needed as social places.  Peter Ingwersen (Professor at the Royal School of Library and Information Science in Copenhagen) noted that many Danish libraries were mandated by the government to close, so we must be more concerned about politicians than the market.  Someone in the audience observed that students frequently want libraries’ hours to be extended and wondered why they would desire that if they are all working online.  This suggests that the social aspect of libraries must not be ignored.  Another person said that there will be a continuing need for print; people want books they can touch and share, and many students prefer print textbooks over electronic ones.

It is clear that opinions on the future of libraries are voluminous and varied.  This symposium provided an interesting and valuable look at some of viewpoints of academic researchers on the subject.  On a personal note, it was a privilege for me to be there and to honor Tefko’s career which has been of such a benefit to information science and the information industry.

Happy Birthday, Tefko!

Don Hawkins

Source www.infotodayblog.com



Professor Tefko Saračević (on the left) is recipient of the honorary doctorate from the University of Zadar in 2012.
The University of Zadar is the oldest one in Croatia, founded in 1396.

Professor Tefko Saračević with Dr. Ante Uglešić, rector of the University of Zadar. Photos by Ivan Jamičić.

 
ZADAR- Zadarsko sveučilište dodijelilo je počasni doktorat profesore emeritusu Sveučilišta Rutgers u SAD-u dr. sc. Tefku Saračeviću.

Kao neprikosnoveni stručnjak informacijskih znanosti, profesor Saračević zaslužio je tu počast zbog svog nesebičnog angažmana na kreiranju diplomskog studija knjižničarstva na zadarskom sveučilištu. Počasni doktorat dodijeljen je u području društvenih znanosti, polje informacijskih i komunikacijskih znanosti. Profesor Saračević tijekom svog dugogodišnjeg znanstvenog rada postigao je značajne znanstvene uspjehe na svjetskoj razini, objavio je preko 150 znanstvenih radova.

- Odjel za knjižničarstvo u Zadru, koji obuhvaća i informacijsku znanost, ali i druge djelatnosti, po mom mišljenju, jest najnapredniji u Hrvatskoj. Najmlađi i najrevolucionarniji, uspio je dovući mnoge mlade nastavnike tako da ima dobar kadar za razvitak, ali je istovremeno uspio privući jedan izvanredan kadar studenata, smatra Saračević, koji je studentima knjižničarstva u razgovoru nakon svečanosti poručio da mijenjaju naziv odjela. Trebao bi se zvati Odjel za informacijske znanosti,l pojasnio je prof. Saračević i pročelnici tog odjel Tatjani Aparac Jelušić koja je bila promotorica dodjele počasnog doktorata.

U svojoj zahvali prof. Saračević istaknuo je kako je on sretan čovjek jer ima dvije domovine. -Hrvatska mi je dala osnovne vrijednosti, snagu za savladavanje prepreka, ljubav prema prirodi, što nije teško, te dragocjena prijateljstva koja održavam već 60 godina.U Americi sam dobio priliku, povjerenje u sebe i odnos s vrlo živahnim društvom naših akademičara u tuđini, otkrio je simpatičan prof. Saračević, rođen u Zagrebu 1930 godine. Jugoslaviju je nakon studija elektrotehnike napustio 1957. godine, te preko Austrije došao u Sjedinjene Američke Države u kojima je proveo cijeli svoj radni vijek i gdje i danas živi. Američko državljanstvo dobio je 1964. godine, a hrvatsko nakon osamostaljenja. Već više od četrdeset godina profesor Tefko Saračević djeluje u području informacijskih znanosti.

Izvor www.057info.hr



Professor Tefko Saračević, distinguished Croatian-American expert in Information Sciences

 
Počasni doktorat prof. dr. sc. Tefku Saračeviću

Rektor je pohvalno govorio o novim sveučilišnim programima na svim studijskim razinama, pritom spomenuvši kako neka sveučilišta nisu dopustila svojim djelatnicima rad na mentorskom poslijediplomskom studiju zadarskog sveučilišta "Humanističke znanosti". Kazao je kako je u protekloj godini doktorirao 21 doktorand, a magistriralo je devet kandidata što godinu čini najuspješnijom u povijesti Sveučilišta. Nadalje, spomenuo je i "bolonjske reforme" izrazivši žaljenje što tržište rada ne prepoznaje diplomirane prvostupnike. Najzad, spomenuo je brojne nagrade koje je dobio projekt ROKi (prototip robota u kirurgiji).

Nakon rektorovog govora i "Polke Slava" koju je na klaviru izvela Branka Aždajić, uručen je počasni doktorat prof. dr. sc. Tefku Saračeviću, profesoru emeritusu Sveučilišta Rutgers (SAD) za izuzetan doprinos u znanstveno-nastavnom radu u polju informacijskih znanosti. Pokretač inicijative za dodjelu ovog počasnog doktorata je Odjel za knjižničarstvo Sveučilišta u Zadru, pa je i promociju vodila prof. dr. sc. Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić.

Po uvriježenom običaju i ova je Svečana sjednica u povodu Dana Sveučilišta iskorištena za dodjelu Rektorove nagrade najuspješnijim studentima i zaslužnim djelatnicima. Dobitnici nagrade među studentima su: Tereza Kaurinović, Đurđina Lakošeljac, Irena Pavela, Denis Radoš, Matko Sorić, Gabrijela Vidić i Krešimir Vuković. Zaslužni djelatnici dobitnici Rektorove nagrade su Marija Crljenko, Petar Čovo, Davor Dević i Ankica Križanac.

Odjel za knjižničarstvo najbolji u Hrvatskoj

Od jučer Sveučilište u Zadru ima još jednog počasnog doktoranta, profesora emeritusa Sveučilišta Rutgers u SAD-u dr. sc. Tefka Saračevića. Počasni doktorat dodijeljen je u području društvenih znanosti, polje informacijskih i komunikacijskih znanosti. Profesor Saračević tijekom svog dugogodišnjeg znanstvenog rada postigao je značajne znanstvene uspjehe na svjetskoj razini, objavio je preko 150 znanstvenih radova, a svojim savjetima sudjelovao je na oblikovanju novih, tzv. bolonjskih programa na Odsjeku za informacijske znanosti pri Sveučilištu J. J. Strossmayera u Osijeku te pojedinih diplomskih i doktorskih studija na Sveučilištu u Zadru. Dr. Saračević istaknuo je kako je ovo priznanje, njemu osobno, najvažnije koje je do sada dobio.

- Ovo je najveća od počasti koju sam primio i doživio u životu. Doživio sam ih dosta, primio dosta, ali dobiti počasni doktorat od sveučilišta u Hrvatskoj, a pogotovo u Zadru s kojim sam povezan, nije samo počast nego i veliko zadovoljstvo, rekao je profesor Saračević.

Njegove veze sa Zadrom i Sveučilištem u Zadru najčvršće su u polju informacijskih znanosti koje se izučavaju na Odjelu za knjižničarstvo za kojeg ima samo riječi hvale.

- Ovaj Odjel za knjižničarstvo u Zadru, koji obuhvaća i informacijsku znanost, ali i druge djelatnosti, po mom mišljenju, jest najnapredniji u Hrvatskoj. Najmlađi i najrevolucionarniji, uspio je dovući mnoge mlade nastavnike tako da ima dobar kadar za razvitak, ali je istovremeno uspio privući jedan izvanredan kadar studenata, smatra Saračević.

U svom govoru zahvale na Svečanoj sjednici profesor Saračević istaknuo je kako mu je predsjednik Sveučilišta Rutgers, kada je čuo za njegov počasni doktorat, poslao pismo u kojem je iskazao neizmjerno zadovoljstvo ovakvim očvršćivanjem suradnje sa Sveučilištem u Zadru, naglasivši kako je njegov počasni doktorat ponos cijeloj zajednici Rutgers.

Izvor www.zadarskilist.hr


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