Search


Advanced Search
Nenad Bach - Editor in Chief

Sponsored Ads
 »  Home  »  Science  »  Henry Suzzallo, president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926
 »  Home  »  People  »  Henry Suzzallo, president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926
 »  Home  »  History  »  Henry Suzzallo, president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926
Henry Suzzallo, president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926
By Prof.Dr. Darko Zubrinic | Published  10/1/2007 | Science , People , History | Unrated
Henry Suzzallo, outstanding university professor in the USA





 

Henry Suzzallo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Henry Suzzallo (August 22, 1875 - September 25, 1933) was president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926. He later served as director of the National Advisory Committee on Education and president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

He was of Croatian descent, born in San Jose, California just after his parents' emigration from Dalmatia. Poor health in his youth resulted in mediocre grades during his primary and secondary education. He graduated from Stanford University in 1899, and went to Columbia University for graduate school, where he got his master's degree in 1902 and his Ph.D. in 1905. His focus was educational sociology. He was deputy superintendent of city schools in San Francisco, professor of education at Stanford, and professor of educational sociology at Columbia, before becoming president of the University of Washington in 1915.

"It was there (Columbia) that the Washington regents found him (Suzzallo) in 1915, and he returned to the coast of his birth gladly. The University of Pittsburgh tried to lure him east again in 1919, offering to double his salary. He refused. The Carnegie Foundation, the National Research Council, the English Speaking Union, the Hall of Fame, the Scouts, the International Institute of the University of Heidelberg, and a dozen or so literary, sociological, and scientific societies soon made inroads on his time, recognizing him for a man of creditable character and intelligence; hearing of him from his many friends as one in whom force combined with charm, integrity with flexibility of manner. His prime attention, however, he devoted to the institution that was now in his charge" (Time magazine, October 18, 1926).

Suzzallo, along with two other University of Washington faculty members, Richard Frederick Scholz (History Professor - predicted the rise of fascism in Europe) and Dr. Robert Max Garrett (English Professor - humanitarian), became an honorary member and advisor of the Phi Lambda chapter of the Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America upon its charter in December of 1920. Suzzallo's involvement with the Phi Lambda chapter of Zeta Psi is unusual because he did not become a member until after he was President of the University of Washington.

During World War I, Suzzallo served as a chairman of the State Board of Defense, an advisor to the War Labor Board, and as a member of the Labor Industries Board. A labor dispute at the time concerned the eight hour workday in the logging and lumber industry, which Suzzallo favored and helped enact. Suzzallo's actions enraged lumberman Ronald H. Hartley, who was elected governor in 1924. In 1926, Hartley removed five of the seven members of the University of Washington's Board of Regents and replaced them with his own appointees. The new board shortly thereafter announced Suzzallo's "leave of absence" for no apparent reason. Enraged students threatened to strike, but were compelled not to upon Suzzallo's request.

After his dismissal from the University of Washington, Suzzallo became associated with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, which he became president of in 1930.

He died in Seattle, Washington in 1933. Suzzallo Library, the University of Washington's central library, is named in honor of him.

Source




Henry Suzzallo
Photo from the University of Washington


 
All of us local Seattleites know the name Suzzallo. In fact, any one of us who attended the University of Washington could not have possibly graduated without spending at least a few hours in the famous Suzzallo library! Below you will find one of many historical pieces on one Henry Suzzallo, gathered by Adam Eterović. Full of interesting facts, most interestingly so, you will find out he was Croatian! The name has been written several
ways over the years: Suzzallo - Suzzalo - Suzalo. The name is actually Cucalo from Ljuta in Dalmatia, Croatia.

Suzzallo, Henry

- M. Petrich

Henry Suzzallo Advances  Education  - The Suzzallo Library at the University of Washington was named for the most famous Croatian educator of our time. Dr. Henry Suzzallo was born in San Jose, California, on August 22, 1875. His father, a sailor who came around the Horn and landed in San Francisco, had emigrated from Dalmatia, Croatia. Suzzallo was educated in the schools of San Jose and at Stanford and Columbia Universities.

In 1915, Henry Suzzallo was elected to the position of president of the University of Washington. Through his efforts and genius, the university was developed into one of the outstanding institutions of learning in the West. Suzzallo firmly believed that education should be able to train the students to think, and his educational pursuits never deviated from this goal.

He directed himself towards raising the entrance requirements of the university, and he expanded the curriculum by the institution of courses in forestry and fish culture, the two most important industries of the state. In 1926, Henry Suzzallo was dismissed as president of the University of Washington due to controversy concerning the political control of the states educational system. After having served as chairman of the board of trustees of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, he was sent abroad as an interpreter of American education and lectured in many leading universities in Europe. Upon his return to the United States, he was made a director of the National Advisory Committee on Education. In 1933, Suzzallo became the president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He occupied this position until his death.

Source




Suzzallo Library
central library of the University of Washington


 
Suzzallo Library, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA, 1926

The University of Washington was founded in 1861. The Suzzallo Library, named after the University's 15th president, Henry Suzzallo, was opened in 1926. The Reading Room, designed in the collegiate gothic style, occupies the whole west facade of the third floor.



Henry Suzzallo (born August 22, 1875 in San Jose, California; died September 25, 1933 in Seattle, Washington) was president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926. He later served as director of the National Advisory Committee on Education and president of the Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching .

He was of Croatian descent, born just after his parents' emigration from Dalmatia. He graduated from Stanford University in 1899, and went to Columbia University for graduate school, where he got his master's degree in 1902 and his Ph.D. in 1905.

He was deputy superintendent of city schools in San Francisco, professor of education at Stanford, and professor of educational sociology at Columbia, before becoming president of the University of Washington in 1915.

Suzzallo Library, the University of Washington's central library, is named in honor of him.



Guide to the Henry Suzzallo papers 1903-1937



 

Suzzallo Library


Suzzallo Library

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. It is named for Henry Suzzallo, who was president of the University of Washington until he stepped down in 1926, the same year the first phase of the library's construction was completed.

The library's original architects, Charles H. Bebb and Carl F. Gould, called for three structures built in Collegiate Gothic style and arranged in a roughly equilateral triangle with a bell tower in the center. The first phase, which dominates the eastern side of Central Plaza, better known as Red Square, forms the west face of this triangle. The south face of the triangle was completed in 1936 in the second phase of construction.

The original plans were abandoned with the third wing of the library, completed in 1963. By this time the University had largely moved away from its earlier architectural style adopting instead modernist concrete and glass forms. A final addition was completed in 1990 with the Kenneth S. Allen Library wing, named for Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's father, an associate director of the University library system from 1960 to 1982.

The bell tower called for in the original plans was never built. Between the years 2000 and 2002 Suzzallo Library underwent extensive retrofitting to strengthen the structure's integrity as a precaution against the effects of an earthquake. It was still open to the public throughout the entire renovation process, but sections were closed for periods of time.

The 240-foot long Graduate Reading Room features cathedral ceilings and tall stained glass windows and spans the entire third floor of the west face of the library. Its distinctive look is said to have been inspired by Henry Suzzallo's openly-stated belief that universities should be "cathedrals of learning."

Adorning the exterior of the early wings are terra cotta sculptures of influential thinkers and artists selected by the faculty. They include Moses, Louis Pasteur, Dante Alighieri, Shakespeare, Plato, Benjamin Franklin, Justinian I, Isaac Newton, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Herodotus, Adam Smith, Homer, Johann Gutenberg, Ludwig van Beethoven, Charles Darwin and Hugo Grotius. Three figures representing "Mastery", "Inspiration", and "Thought" additionally appear above the main entrance.

Library Collection

Of the 6 million volumes that make up the University of Washington Libraries collection, approximately 1.6 million are housed in Suzzallo/Allen Library. Along with the Main Collection, Suzzallo/Allen Library also has a Children's Literature, Government Publications, Natural Sciences, and Periodicals collections. The Special Collections contains a Rare Book Collection with books printed pre-1801. The Microforms/Newspapers collection is the largest collection of microform materials in any Association of Researches Library library.

Suzzallo Library also houses the main technical services units of the UW Libraries, including the Monographic Services Division and the Serials Services Division.

Source



 

Inside Suzzallo

Suzzallo Reading Room

When the library first opened in 1927 it was easy to see why Pres. Henry Suzzallo referred to it as "the soul of the University". (Dorpat, Vol. I) Suzzallo was an amazing man, who charmed and fascinated any group with his well-informed speeches. It was said that he could speak all day long without repeating himself. Suzzallo was convinced that the library should be a monumental cathedral-like structure dominating the "entire campus architecturally, symbolizing the unity of all learning, and emphasizing in its design the inspiration and the spiritual qualities which should infuse the quest for knowledge." (Gates, p. 152) Upon entering the reading room pictured above, one can observe the success of Suzzallo's ambitious plan. A marble stairway leads up to the third floor and the 240' long room, which is decorated with Tudor vaults, 36' high stained glass windows, and a cork floor (for quietness!).

Source: www.washington.edu





Henry Suzzallo, source www.historylink.org



Biographical Note

Henry Suzzallo was president of the University of Washington from 1915 to 1926; president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching from 1913 to1933; arbitrator of the National War Labor Policies Board; and chairman of the Washington State Council of Defence from 1917 to1918. He also worked toward the adoption of better living and working conditions for loggers in the lumber industry. He died in 1933.

Glenn Hughes, who founded the University of Washington (UW) Dramatic Art Department under Henry Suzzallo, described him as "a brilliant man, small and dynamic--the Napoleon of higher education." The characterization was apt; Suzzallo's career was marked by both tremendous achievement and bitter controversies. He was born in 1875 to Croatian immigrants. Following a sickly childhood, Suzzallo began college at the State Normal School in his home town of San Jose, California, lacking both the money and the grades to attend his first choice, Stanford. After two years he graduated, taking a teaching job in a two-room school in Alviso, California. His degree from the Normal School and money from teaching removed the academic and financial barriers, allowing him to attend Stanford. For the next eighteen years, Suzzallo would shuffle between Stanford and Columbia, first pursuing his education, and later as a faculty member at both institutions. During this time, he managed to win himself an increasingly prestigious reputation. When the UW began searching for a new president in 1914, Suzzallo's name was on the short list of candidates.

In 1914, the UW was a small frontier college undergoing the first growing pains of becoming a major university. It claimed an enrollment of more than 3,000 students, small by the standards of the major American universities of the time, but still a tremendous increase over previous years. It also suffered from a less-than-robust budget. James R. Angell, the Regents first choice for president, declined the job, primarily because he considered the UW underfunded. Suzzallo was the Regents second choice, and he accepted the challenge. Even though money never flowed freely, he did prove remarkably adept at squeezing funding from both private donors and the Legislature. Plans for a magnificent new library, patterned after a medieval cathedral, symbolized his success in expanding the size of the campus and the prestige of the university. (The library would eventually bear his name). During this time, enrollment had burgeoned to over 10,000. Suzzallo further augmented his stature in the state during World War I, when he was president of the Washington Council of Defense, which had primary responsibility for the states war effort. The "Napoleon of higher education" was not to be spared his Waterloo, however.

The 1924 election of governor Roland Hartley would shatter the relative calm of Suzzallo's presidency. Hartley won on a platform promising government retrenchment and lower taxes. He also had a record of long-standing antagonism towards the UW, which he saw as a hotbed of socialism. "Education is a fine thing," he acknowledged, but that is not all there is to the game of life. The year of the election, Suzzallo had published his book Our Faith in Education, written primarily to present the case for higher education against those who wanted to limit it in favor of tax reduction. Not surprisingly, Hartley's parsimony quickly conflicted with Suzzallo's educational vision. Suzzallo's high salary--$18,000 a year, larger than any other state official--made him and the University especially vulnerable to attack. Not only did Hartley want to curtail university expenditures, he also proposed overhauling the funding and administration system for the states colleges and universities. Suzzallo did nothing to hide his strong objections to the governors agenda. The battle spread to the Legislature and the Board of Regents, both Suzzallo allies. Each camp insisted adamantly, if implausibly, that it represented a political virtue intent on rescuing higher education from the political machinations of its opponents.

Hartley overcame the obstacle of the recalcitrant Regents by removing members supportive of Suzzallo. The Board, now dominated by Hartleys new appointees, put Suzzallo on indefinite leave-of-absence when he refused to resign. Suzzallo's ouster created a political firestorm, although a petition drive for a gubernatorial recall election, despite early momentum, sputtered, and failed to collect the required number of signatures. Suzzallo was flooded immediately with job offers. He decided to accept election as chairman of the board of the Carnegie Foundation. He remained affiliated with the Carnegie Foundation until complications following a heart attack in Seattle claimed his life on September 25, 1933.

Source: University of Washington, Libraries




Henry Suzzallo (on the right) in 1920, source www.historylink.org


 
Ethnic Slur Missed Its Target

In the "Prelude" column in the Sept. issue, reference was made to the gaffe by Governor Rowland Hartley in which he inferred that Dr. Henry Suzzallo was an ethnic Italian. In fact, Suzzallo's parents (they were distant cousins) traced their origin to Herzegovina, where the original Slavic spelling of the family surname was "Zucalo." Both parents (as was Dr. Suzzallo until he abandoned the faith) were Roman Catholics of Croatian ethnicity. Archival material substantiates that Suzzallo readily acknowledged his Croatian roots.

Richard L. Major, '57
Seattle
Source: The University of Washington Alumni



According to the following source, Suzzallo's parents are from the village of Grepci (or Grebci) in eastern part of Herzegovina (Herzegovina is a historical part of present day Bosnia and Herzegovina). The village is near the Croatian border, not far from the city of Dubrovnik. Here we can see how the village looks like today.



Village idyll. A gently, intimate link between the stone house and the garden with cabbages planted. The family would light a fire and spend the weekend here. The final abandonment of the village was brought on by the firm border with the Republic of Croatia. In a house with no roof and three windows, here on the picture, the father of Henri Zucalo was born who was written about in Vrutak no. 10.

(In Croatian) Seoska idila. Nježna, intimna veza kamenog doma i bašče s zasađenim kupusom - raštikom. Vatru je zapalila obitelj koja tu provodi vikend. Definitivnom napuštanju sela doprinjela je i tvrda granica s RH. U kući bez krova s tri prozora, koja se vidi na slici, rodio se otac Henria Zucala o kome je pisao Vrutak u broju 10.

Source: www.rb-donjahercegovina.ba

Acknowledgement. Many thanks to Mr. Marko Puljić for information contained in this frame. (D. Ž.)




University of British Columbia's First Honorary Degree Recipients, 1925: Henry Suzzallo on the left




 
John H. Walsh and Henry Suzzallo are authors of an important series of three books dealing with bussiness arithmetics:

1. Walsh-Suzzallo Arithmetics, Book One: Fundamental Processes (Paperback), 284 pp, Authors: John H. Walsh,  Henry Suzzallo



The book has been reprinted in June 2007 by Kessinger Publishing: "...Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as a part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world's literature."

ISBN: 9781432652982 [see Amazon]

2. Walsh-Suzzallo Arithmetics, Book Two Practical Applications, by John Walsh Henry Suzzalo. publisher: DC Heath & Co / 1914 / Hardcover / 518 Pages

3. Walsh- Suzzallo Arithmetics: Book Three: Business and Industrial Practice, Boston, D. C. Heath And Company 1914, Hardcover.



Henry Suzzalo is the author of another book on arithemtic:

The teaching of primary arithmetic; a critical study of recent tendencies in method - Suzzallo, Henry, 1875-1933
(Keywords: Arithmetic - Study and teaching)

Another book by Henry Suzzallo:

The Rise of Local School Supervision in Massachusetts (the School Committee, 1635-1827) (Hardcover), 154 pp



 

HENRY SUZZALLO (1875. - 1933.)

Amerikanac hrvatskog podrijetla - reformator sveukupnoga školskog sustava Sjedinjenih Američkih Država 

Prof. dr. Ivo TRINAJSTIĆ, Zagreb

...Iz vrlo skromnih američkih izvora o podrijetlu H. Suzzalla može se jedino saznati da su njegovi roditelji Petar i Ana Suzzallo, podrijetlom iz Dalmacije, 1852. godine došli u San Francisco, da mu je otac bio najprije rudar u Placervilleu, a kasnije je bio poduzetnik u novopreimenovanom gradu San Joseu.

H. Suzzallo (sl. 1.) tako je rođen u San Joseu (Kalifornija) 22. kolovoza 1875. godine, osnovnu i srednju školu završio je u rodnom gradu, a visoku naobrazbu stekao je na Stanford-University, 1899. godine. Svoju nastavničku službu započeo je 1897. u Poljoprivrednoj školi u Alvisu, a 1899. postaje učiteljem u školi u Alamedi. Studije nastavlja na Columbia-University, te 1905. stječe doktorat znanosti i kraće vrijeme radi na Yale-University, pa se 1906. vrati u Kaliforniju kao "assistent-professor" na Sveučilištu Stanford. Nešto kasnije (1907. - 1909.) radi na Sveučilištu Columbia, gdje osniva katedru za sociologiju obrazovanja, prvu u tom dijelu Sjedinjenih Država.

Svakako najznačajniji položaj koji je H. Suzzallu u to vrijeme dodijeljen bio je izbor za predsjednika (rektora) Sveučilišta u Seattleu - "University of Washington State", 1915. godine, na kojem se položaju zadržao do 1926. godine. Tijekom toga vremena broj se studenata na tom sveučilištu povećao sa 1840 na 6850, a broj "fakulteta" (predmeta) sa 218 na 304. Među ostalim, osnovao je Šumarski fakultet (College of Forestry), donacijom uspješnog poduzetnika koji se bavio drvenom građom iz obitelji Anderson (Anderson Hall), Fakultet ribogojstva (College of fisheries) i Aeronautički fakultet. Tako je njegovom zaslugom u Seattle došao i mladi inženjer zrakoplovstva Willhelm Boeing, koji je tu osnovao tvornicu zrakoplova "Boeing", iz koje su u naše vrijeme izišli i najpoznatiji, suvremeni putnički zrakoplovi Boeing 727, 737 i 747. Taj posljednji je, zbog svoje veličine poznat pod imenom "jumbo-jet" (veliki slonić). Boeingove zrakoplove je u svojoj floti donedavno imala i hrvatska zrakoplovna tvrtka "Croatia Lines", a pitanje je zna li itko od nas da je za osnivanje Boeinga bio zaslužan upravo Hrvat Henry Suzzallo.


Kao što se to događalo više puta u razvitku pojedinih sveučilišta u odnosu na političku vlast, dogodilo se tako i u državi Washingtonu, kad je 1926. guverner Roland Hartley želio ograničiti autonomiju Sveučilišta u Seattleu i staviti ga pod političku kontrolu, Suzzallo se tomu usprotivio te je morao dati ostavku na položaj rekora Sveučilišta države Washingtona. Od tada se posvećuje reorganizaciji i unapređenju školstva u Sjedinjenim Američkim Državama, pa npr. za vrijeme predsjednika Hoovera biva imenovan "specijalnim direktorom nacionalnog ADVISORY odbora za obrazovanje". Upravo je time najpotpunije istaknuta cjelokupna znanstvena aktivnost H. Suzzalla, jer je praktički čitav radni vijek i sve svoje snage posvetio razvitku, organizaciji i preobrazbi cjelokupnog obrazovnog sustava u Sjedinjenim Državama. Suzzallo je naročito isticao socijalnu ulogu obrazovanja. Tako na jednome mjestu Edwin B. Stevens (1949: 148) piše: "Kako najbolje omogućiti visoko obrazovanje za sve, bez obzira na ekonomski ili drugi status, uvijek je bilo na srcu Henryju Suzzallu. Bio je previše svjestan koliko osobno duguje slobodnim institucijama, a da ne bi bio pun razumijevanja. Da njegovi roditelji nisu došli u ovu zemlju, mogao je biti sa svojim 'rođacima na planinama koje se uzdižu s istočnih obala Jadranskog mora, čuvajući stada ovaca ili koza, ili ribar na tom moru', gdje bi se njegove sposobnosti trošile na 'male zadaće'. Zbog toga je bio za to da školarine ne smiju biti nedostupne ni najsiromašnijoj obitelji ... Neki to nisu shvaćali, no oni koji su s njim radili znali su za njegovo zanimanje za studente i za njihove probleme."

Zanimljivo je naglasiti da je prof. Suzzallo tijekom 1928. godine boravio u Europi i na uglednim europskim sveučilištima održao niz predavanja. Posjetio je sveučilišta u Beču, Beogradu, Bologni, Budimpešti, Bukureštu, Firenci, Padovi, Sofiji i Zagrebu. U nadi da ću i u Hrvatskoj naći neki podatak o tako važnoj osobi kao što je bio profesor Suzzallo, posjetio sam sve one institucije za koje sam smatrao da bi mogle, da ne kažem trebale, imati neke podatke o boravku prof. Suzzalla u Zagrebu. Nažalost, nisam našao praktički ništa. Ipak, u arhivima Rektorata Sveučilišta u Zagrebu uspio sam pronaći samo jedan brzojav koji je poslan iz Beograda 28. svibnja 1928. s upitom kada bi "Profesor Suzzallo trebao doći u Beograd" (sl. 2.), te jedno pismo koje je iz Maribora upućeno u Zagreb.

Za jednoga svog posjeta Seattleu H. Suzzallo je iznenada 25. rujna 1933. godine preminuo pa neka i ovaj mali prilog bude sjećanje na njega.



"Suzzallo-Library" sastoji se od dva dijela. Glavna zgrada visoka je, moderna peterokatnica s dva kata ispod razine tla i u nju se može ući iz velike podzemne garaže. U prizemlju, u velikom ulaznom predvorju postavljena je velika mjedena ploča posvećena Henryju Suzzallu. U knjižnici je pohranjeno (1991. god.) oko 4 milijuna naslova.



Suzzallo Library

Prirodoslovni odio Knjižnice (gornja slika) jest zgrada gradena u engleskom "gotičkom" slogu s dva kata iznad i dva kata ispod razine tla, a njezina je unutrašnjost potpuno preuredena i modernizirana 1990. godine. Povezana je s glavnom zgradom u razini prvoga kata ostakljenim mostom.


U prirodoslovnom sam dijelu (gornja slika) dva mjeseca gotovo svaki dan boravio od 9 do 16 sati i tamo sam mogao potpuno sam i neometan pregledavati vrlo bogatu literaturu koja me je zanimala. Posebno sam se obradovao što u knjižnici imaju komplet svih godišta i brojeva hrvatskog botaničkog časopisa "Acta botanica croatica", iako sam uvjeren da najveći dio zaposlenih ne bi znao gdje se ta Hrvatska i taj grad Zagreb nalaze.

Kratki izbor literature o H. Suzzallu:

Gates, Ch. M., 1961: The first century at the University of Washington 1861-1961. University of Washington Press. Seattle. 252 str.

Odegaard, Ch. E., 1864: The University of Washington. Pioneering in its First and Second Century. The Newcomen Society in North America. New York-Downingtown-Princeton-Portland. 24 str.

Pearson, H. C. 1919: Essential of spelling by Henry Carr Pearson and Henry Suzzallo. American Book Company. New York. 196 str.

Strevens, E., B., 1949: Higher Educatios's Social Role. Journal of Higher Education 20: 147-149.

*** Suzzallo, Henry. The National Cyclopedia of American Biography 24: 38-39, 1935.

Objavljeno u časopisu Priroda



Formated for CROWN by prof.dr. Darko Žubrinić
Distributed by www.Croatia.org . This message is intended for Croatian Associations/Institutions and their Friends in Croatia and in the World. The opinions/articles expressed on this list do not reflect personal opinions of the moderator. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, please delete or destroy all copies of this communication and please, let us know!


How would you rate the quality of this article?

Verification:
Enter the security code shown below:
imgRegenerate Image


Add comment
Related Links
Comments
  • Comment #1 (Posted by Marko)

    There are some who claim that Dr. Suzzallo's Croatian roots originate from Hercegovina:

    http://www.rb-donjahercegovina.ba/GisPodaci.aspx?id=53

    Source: http://www.washington.edu/alumni/columns/dec02/letters.html

    Ethnic Slur Missed Its Target

    In the "Prelude" column in the Sept. issue, reference was made to the gaffe by Governor Rowland Hartley in which he inferred that Dr. Henry Suzzallo was an ethnic Italian. In fact, Suzzallo's parents (they were distant cousins) traced their origin to Herzegovina, where the original Slavic spelling of the family surname was "Zucalo." Both parents (as was Dr. Suzzallo until he abandoned the faith) were Roman Catholics of Croatian ethnicity. Archival material substantiates that Suzzallo readily acknowledged his Croatian roots.

    Richard L. Major, '57
    Seattle

     
Submit Comment


Article Options
Croatian Constellation



Popular Articles
  1. (E) 100 Years Old Hotel Therapia reopens in Crikvenica
  2. Dr. Andrija Puharich: parapsychologist, medical researcher, and inventor
  3. Europe 2007: Zagreb the Continent's new star
  4. Violi Calvert: Nenad Bach in China to be interviewed by China Radio International
  5. Potres u Zagrebu - Earthquake in Zagreb, Croatia 28 listopad 2006 u 16:15 3.7 on a Richter
No popular articles found.