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NFCA Press Release: The NATO Freedom Consolidation Act of 2007
By Joe Foley | Published  03/12/2007 | News , Politics | Unrated
The Republic of Croatia is designated as eligible to receive assistance under the program




NFCA Press Release

H.R. 987 - The NATO Freedom Consolidation Act of 2007

For immediate release:

Washington, D.C. -- H.R. 987 passed the U.S. House of Representatives on
March 6, 2007.  The legislation has foreign assistance authorization
language in it for several NATO designated nation-states;  so it is more
than a 'Sense of Congress' policy statement by the House.  The text of the
House Bill is below.  The U.S. Senate is also working on a NATO-oriented
legislative item.

The House Bill (H.R. 987) also has good reiterations of NATO enlargement
legislative history in its text.  Furthermore, Paragraph 10 under Sec. 2
"Findings" regarding the Vilnius NATO Summit in 2000, Paragraph 15 regarding
the 2004 Istanbul Summit, Paragraph 21 regarding the Riga Summit 2006, and
Paragraph 22 (all under the same section) reference Croatia, the A3
nation-states including Macedonia and Albania, and related membership
issues.  Note that Paragraph 15 underscores that "NATO will continue to
assess each country's candidacy individually."

And, under Sec. 4, Paragraph 2:  The Republic of Croatia is designated as
eligible to receive assistance under the program established under section
203(a) of the NATO Participation Act of 1994, and shall be deemed to have
been so designated pursuant to section 203(d)(1) of such Act.

Best regards,

Joe Foley
Government & Public Affairs Director
National Federation of Croatian Americans (NFCA)
www.nfcaonline.com
Tel: (301) 208-6650

------------------------------------------------------------------------
NATO Freedom Consolidation Act of 2007 (Introduced in House)

110th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 987

To endorse further enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO) and to facilitate the timely admission of new members to NATO, and
for other purposes.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


February 12, 2007

Mr. TANNER (for himself, Mr. GILLMOR, Mr. LANTOS, Ms. ROS-LEHTINEN, Mr.
WEXLER, and Mr. GALLEGLY) introduced the following bill; which was referred
to the Committee on Foreign Affairs
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A BILL

To endorse further enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO) and to facilitate the timely admission of new members to NATO, and
for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United
States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `NATO Freedom Consolidation Act of 2007'.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The sustained commitment of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO) to mutual defense has made possible the democratic transformation of
Central and Eastern Europe. Members of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization can and should play a critical role in addressing the security
challenges of the post-Cold War era in creating the stable environment
needed for those emerging democracies in Europe.

(2) Lasting stability and security in Europe requires the military,
economic, and political integration of emerging democracies into existing
European structures.

(3) In an era of threats from terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of
mass destruction, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization is increasingly
contributing to security in the face of global security challenges for the
protection and interests of its member states.

(4) In the NATO Participation Act of 1994 (title II of Public Law 103-447;
22 U.S.C. 1928 note), Congress declared that `full and active participants
in the Partnership for Peace in a position to further the principles of the
North Atlantic Treaty and to contribute to the security of the North
Atlantic area should be invited to become full NATO members in accordance
with Article 10 of such Treaty at an early date ...'.

(5) In the NATO Enlargement Facilitation Act of 1996 (title VI of section
101(c) of title I of division A of Public Law 104-208; 22 U.S.C. 1928 note),
Congress called for the prompt admission of Poland, Hungary, the Czech
Republic, and Slovenia to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and
declared that `in order to promote economic stability and security in
Slovakia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Moldova,
and Ukraine ... the process of enlarging NATO to include emerging
democracies in Central and Eastern Europe should not be limited to
consideration of admitting Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Slovenia
as full members of the NATO Alliance'.

(6) In the European Security Act of 1998 (title XXVII of division G of
Public Law 105-277; 22 U.S.C. 1928 note), Congress declared that `Poland,
Hungary, and the Czech Republic should not be the last emerging democracies
in Central and Eastern Europe invited to join NATO' and that `Romania,
Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Bulgaria ... would make an outstanding
contribution to furthering the goals of NATO and enhancing stability,
freedom, and peace in Europe should they become NATO members [and] upon
complete satisfaction of all relevant criteria should be invited to become
full NATO members at the earliest possible date'.

(7) In the Gerald B. H. Solomon Freedom Consolidation Act of 2002 (Public
Law 107-187; 22 U.S.C. 1928 note), Congress endorsed `... the vision of
further enlargement of the NATO Alliance articulated by President George W.
Bush on June 15, 2001, and by former President William J. Clinton on October
22, 1996'.

(8) At the Madrid Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in July
1997, Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic were invited to join the
Alliance, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization heads of state and
government issued a declaration stating `[t]he alliance expects to extend
further invitations in coming years to nations willing and able to assume
the responsibilities and obligations of membership ... [n]o European
democratic country whose admission would fulfill the objectives of the
[North Atlantic] Treaty will be excluded from consideration'.

(9) At the Washington Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in
April 1999, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization heads of state and
government issued a communique declaring `[w]e pledge that NATO will
continue to welcome new members in a position to further the principles of
the [North Atlantic] Treaty and contribute to peace and security in the
Euro-Atlantic area ... [t]he three new members will not be the last ... [n]o
European democratic country whose admission would fulfill the objectives of
the Treaty will be excluded from consideration, regardless of its geographic
location ...'.

(10) In May 2000 in Vilnius, Lithuania, the foreign ministers of Albania,
Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, the Republic of Macedonia, Romania,
Slovakia, and Slovenia issued a statement (later joined by Croatia)
declaring that--

(A) their countries will cooperate in jointly seeking membership in the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization in the next round of enlargement of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization;

(B) the realization of membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization
by one or more of these countries would be a success for all; and

(C) eventual membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization for all of
these countries would be a success for Europe and for the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization.

(11) On June 15, 2001, in a speech in Warsaw, Poland, President George W.
Bush stated `[a]ll of Europe's new democracies, from the Baltic to the Black
Sea and all that lie between, should have the same chance for security and
freedom--and the same chance to join the institutions of Europe--as Europe's
old democracies have ... I believe in NATO membership for all of Europe's
democracies that seek it and are ready to share the responsibilities that
NATO brings ... [a]s we plan to enlarge NATO, no nation should be used as a
pawn in the agenda of others ... [w]e will not trade away the fate of free
European peoples ... [n]o more Munichs ... [n]o more Yaltas ... [a]s we plan
the Prague Summit, we should not calculate how little we can get away with,
but how much we can do to advance the cause of freedom'.

(12) On October 22, 1996, in a speech in Detroit, Michigan, former President
William J. Clinton stated `NATO's doors will not close behind its first new
members ... NATO should remain open to all of Europe's emerging democracies
who are ready to shoulder the responsibilities of membership ... [n]o nation
will be automatically excluded ... [n]o country outside NATO will have a
veto ... [a] gray zone of insecurity must not reemerge in Europe'.

(13) At the Prague Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in
November 2002, Bulgaria, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia, and
Slovenia were invited to join the Alliance in the second round of
enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization since the end of the
Cold War, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization heads of state and
government issued a declaration stating `NATO's door will remain open to
European democracies willing and able to assume the responsibilities and
obligations of membership, in accordance with Article 10 of the Washington
Treaty'.

(14) On May 8, 2003, the United States Senate unanimously approved the
Resolution of Ratification to Accompany Treaty Document No. 108-4, Protocols
to the North Atlantic Treaty of 1949 on Accession of Bulgaria, Estonia,
Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia, inviting Bulgaria,
Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia to join the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

(15) At the Istanbul Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in
June 2004, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization heads of state and
government issued a communique reaffirming that NATO's door remains open to
new members, declaring `[w]e celebrate the success of NATO's Open Door
Policy, and reaffirm today that our seven new members will not be the last.
The door to membership remains open. We welcome the progress made by
Albania, Croatia, and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (1) in
implementing their Annual National Programmes under the Membership Action
Plan, and encourage them to continue pursuing the reforms necessary to
progress toward NATO membership. We also commend their contribution to
regional stability and cooperation. We want all three countries to succeed
and will continue to assist them in their reform efforts. NATO will continue
to assess each country's candidacy individually, based on the progress made
towards reform goals pursued through the Membership Action Plan, which will
remain the vehicle to keep the readiness of each aspirant for membership
under review. We direct that NATO Foreign Ministers keep the enlargement
process, including the implementation of the Membership Action Plan, under
continual review and report to us. We will review at the next Summit
progress by aspirants towards membership based on that report'.

(16) Georgia and Ukraine have stated their desire to join the Euro-Atlantic
community, and in particular, are seeking to join the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization. Georgia and Ukraine are working closely with the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization and its members to meet criteria for eventual
membership in NATO.

(17) At a press conference with President Mikhail Saakashvili of Georgia in
Washington, DC on July 5, 2006, President George W. Bush stated that `... I
believe that NATO would benefit with Georgia being a member of NATO, and I
think Georgia would benefit. And there's a way forward through the
Membership Action Plan ... And I'm a believer in the expansion of NATO. I
think it's in the world's interest that we expand NATO'.

(18) Following a meeting of NATO Foreign Ministers in New York on September
21, 2006, NATO Secretary General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer announced the
launching of an Intensified Dialogue on membership between the Alliance and
Georgia.

(19) At the NATO-Ukraine Commission Summit in Brussels in February 2005,
President of Ukraine Victor Yushchenko declared membership in NATO as the
ultimate goal of Ukraine's cooperation with the Alliance and expressed
Ukraine's desire to conclude a Membership Action Plan.

(20) At the NATO-Ukraine Commission Foreign Ministerial meeting in Vilnius
in April 2005, NATO and Ukraine launched an Intensified Dialogue on the
potential membership of Ukraine in NATO.

(21) At the Riga Summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in
November 2006, the Heads of State and Government of the member countries of
NATO issued a declaration reaffirming that NATO's door remains open to new
members, declaring that `all European democratic countries may be considered
for MAP (Membership Action Plan) or admission, subject to decision by the
NAC (North Atlantic Council) at each stage, based on the performance of
these countries towards meeting the objectives of the North Atlantic Treaty.
We direct that NATO Foreign Ministers keep that process under continual
review and report to us. We welcome the efforts of Albania, Croatia, and the
former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to prepare themselves for the
responsibilities and obligations of membership. We reaffirm that the
Alliance will continue with Georgia and Ukraine its Intensified Dialogues
which cover the full range of political, military, financial and security
issues relating to those countries' aspirations to membership, without
prejudice to any eventual Alliance decision. We reaffirm the importance of
the NATO-Ukraine Distinctive Partnership, which has its 10th anniversary
next year and welcome the progress that has been made in the framework of
our Intensified Dialogue. We appreciate Ukraine's substantial contributions
to our common security, including through participation in NATO-led
operations and efforts to promote regional cooperation. We encourage Ukraine
to continue to contribute to regional security. We are determined to
continue to assist, through practical cooperation, in the implementation of
far-reaching reform efforts, notably in the fields of national security,
defence, reform of the defence-industrial sector and fighting corruption. We
welcome the commencement of an Intensified Dialogue with Georgia as well as
Georgia's contribution to international peacekeeping and security
operations. We will continue to engage actively with Georgia in support of
its reform process. We encourage Georgia to continue progress on political,
economic and military reforms, including strengthening judicial reform, as
well as the peaceful resolution of outstanding conflicts on its territory.
We reaffirm that it is of great importance that all parties in the region
should engage constructively to promote regional peace and stability.'

(22) Contingent upon their continued implementation of democratic, defense,
and economic reform, and their willingness and ability to meet the
responsibilities of membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and
a clear expression of national intent to do so, Congress calls for the
timely admission of Albania, Croatia, Georgia, Macedonia, and Ukraine to the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization to promote security and stability in
Europe.

SEC. 3. DECLARATIONS OF POLICY.

Congress--

(1) reaffirms its previous expressions of support for continued enlargement
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization contained in the NATO
Participation Act of 1994, the NATO Enlargement Facilitation Act of 1996,
the European Security Act of 1998, and the Gerald B. H. Solomon Freedom
Consolidation Act of 2002;

(2) supports the commitment to further enlargement of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization to include European democracies that are able and
willing to meet the responsibilities of Membership, as expressed by the
Alliance in its Madrid Summit Declaration of 1997, its Washington Summit
Communique of 1999, its Prague Summit Declaration of 2002, its Istanbul
Summit Communique of 2004, and its Riga Summit Declaration of 2006; and

(3) endorses the vision of further enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization articulated by President George W. Bush on June 15, 2001, and
by former President William J. Clinton on October 22, 1996, and urges our
allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to work with the United
States to realize a role for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in
promoting global security, including continued support for enlargement to
include qualified candidate states, specifically by entering into a
Membership Action Plan with Georgia and recognizing the progress toward
meeting the responsibilities and obligations of NATO membership by Albania,
Croatia, Georgia, Macedonia, and Ukraine.

SEC. 4. DESIGNATION OF ALBANIA, CROATIA, GEORGIA, MACEDONIA, AND UKRAINE AS
ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE ASSISTANCE UNDER THE NATO PARTICIPATION ACT OF 1994.

(a) Designation-

(1) ALBANIA- The Republic of Albania is designated as eligible to receive
assistance under the program established under section 203(a) of the NATO
Participation Act of 1994 (title II of Public Law 103-447; 22 U.S.C. 1928
note), and shall be deemed to have been so designated pursuant to section
203(d)(1) of such Act.

(2) CROATIA- The Republic of Croatia is designated as eligible to receive
assistance under the program established under section 203(a) of the NATO
Participation Act of 1994, and shall be deemed to have been so designated
pursuant to section 203(d)(1) of such Act.

(3) GEORGIA- Georgia is designated as eligible to receive assistance under
the program established under section 203(a) of the NATO Participation Act
of 1994, and shall be deemed to have been so designated pursuant to section
203(d)(1) of such Act.

(4) MACEDONIA- The Republic of Macedonia is designated as eligible to
receive assistance under the program established under section 203(a) of the
NATO Participation Act of 1994, and shall be deemed to have been so
designated pursuant to section 203(d)(1) of such Act.

(5) UKRAINE- Ukraine is designated as eligible to receive assistance under
the program established under section 203(a) of the NATO Participation Act
of 1994, and shall be deemed to have been so designated pursuant to section
203(d)(1) of such Act.

(b) Rule of Construction- The designation of the Republic of Albania, the
Republic of Croatia, Georgia, the Republic of Macedonia, and Ukraine
pursuant to subsection (a) as eligible to receive assistance under the
program established under section 203(a) of the NATO Participation Act of
1994--

(1) is in addition to the designation of Poland, Hungary, the Czech
Republic, and Slovenia pursuant to section 606 of the NATO Enlargement
Facilitation Act of 1996 (title VI of section 101(c) of title I of division
A of Public Law 104-208; 22 U.S.C. 1928 note), the designation of Romania,
Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Bulgaria pursuant to section 2703(b) of the
European Security Act of 1998 (title XXVII of division G of Public Law
105-277; 22 U.S.C. 1928 note), and the designation of Slovakia pursuant to
section 4(a) of the Gerald B. H. Solomon Freedom Consolidation Act of 2002
(Public Law 107-187; 22 U.S.C. 1928 note) as eligible to receive assistance
under the program established under section 203(a) of the NATO Participation
Act of 1994; and

(2) shall not preclude the designation by the President of other countries
pursuant to section 203(d)(2) of the NATO Participation Act of 1994 as
eligible to receive assistance under the program established under section
203(a) of such Act.


SEC. 5. AUTHORIZATION OF SECURITY ASSISTANCE FOR COUNTRIES DESIGNATED UNDER
THE NATO PARTICIPATION ACT OF 1994.


Of the amounts made available for fiscal year 2008 under section 23 of the
Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763) such sums as may be necessary are
authorized to be appropriated for assistance to the Republic of Albania, the
Republic of Croatia, Georgia, the Republic of Macedonia, and Ukraine.

Formated for CROWN by Nenad Bach
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