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 »  Home  »  History  »  (E) Croatian Archbishop Stepinac risked his life to aid the Jews
(E) Croatian Archbishop Stepinac risked his life to aid the Jews
By Nenad N. Bach | Published  04/17/2005 | History | Unrated
(E) Croatian Archbishop Stepinac risked his life to aid the Jews

 

The same NYT published on October 15, 1946 quite different story:" When the Nazis occupied Croatian Archbishop Stepinac risked his life to aid the Jews.

 

From:hmfgsf@juno.com
To: letters@nytimes.com
Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2005
Subject: Cardinal Stepinac, New York Times. 4.3.2005.

Dear Editor:

As Croatians, we are outraged that the New York Times would print a statement regarding Croatia's Cardinal Stepinac's beatification by Pope John Paul as incensing his critics - because Stepinac was the archbishop of Zagreb, Croatia, during WWII, - while you fail to mention that he saved many Jews at his own peril during the Nazi puppet state and opposed racism of any kind. Please compare your article with the article of the NYT of Oct 15, 1946 where you wrote the truth about Cardinal Stepinac with this statement:

"When the Nazis occupied Croatia, Archbishop Stepinac risked his life to aid the Jews. With his aid, hundreds of Jews were smuggled out of the country. He denounced the race laws. He worked with the International Red Cross to rescue Jews in other countries, concealed these victims of racism under his own roof and many of his priests did likewise." You might be interested in the quote by Louis Breiner, President of the American Jewish Society
after the show trial conviction of Cardinal Stepinac in Tito's Yugoslavia: "He was one of the few people in Europe who spoke out against Nazi tyranny, at all hours, when it was dangerous..."

In addition, you are coming up with the utterly false number of 700,000 Serbs, Jews and others sent to death in camps in Croatia. Even one innocent victim is one too many, but the number long established as correct is between 60,000 to 80,000 in camps, while one million perished in WWII in Yugoslavia, most of them as combatants, Croats, Serbs and Bosnian Muslims. So let's not bandy about ad nauseam with numbers instilled by communist Yugoslavia ruled by the Serbs. It is obvious that Serb propaganda against Croatia still flourishes today, even in a respected newspaper as the NYT.
Sincerely,
Hilda M. Foley
National Federation of Croatian Americans
Santa Ana, CA 92705
714 832-0289
All-Embracing Man of Action for a New Era of Papacy

Published: April 3, 2005 (from page 9) NYT

The pope acknowledged as much, but failed to mollify critics, who were also incensed by his beatification of Cardinal Alojzije Stepinac, the archbishop of Zagreb during World War II, when a Nazi puppet regime ruled Croatia and 700,000 Serbs, Jews and others were sent to death camps.
HOWEVER this was published in NYT on 10/15/1946.
The same NYT published on October 15, 1946 quite different story:" When the Nazis occupied Croatian Archbishop Stepinac risked his life to aid the Jews. With his aid hundreds of Jews were smuggled out of the country and obtained the repeal of an order that all Jews must wear a yellow tag. He denounced the Nazi race laws. He worked with the International red Cross to rescue Jews in other countries, concealed these victims of racism under his own roof, and many of his priests did likewise. 
 

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  • Comment #1 (Posted by Mir)

    Beautifully and truthfully written... Thank you
     
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